Monday, September 7, 2015

Jim's Far North Queensland Adventure



I have just completed my eighth trip across this vast continent. This trip lasted 63 days and was the most rewarding one so far in a birding sense. I saw 284 native species of which 40 were ‘lifers’ for me.

The major highlight was at last finding what has been thus far my lifelong nemesis – the Grey Falcon. I learned of a possible location and there they were! Subsequently I also found another pair with nest and another single bird.

(Click on images to enlarge)



The main area covered this trip was the Cape York Peninsula, Iron Range National Park and the Jardine River National Park.



The first week was spent with three others on a birding tour with Close Up Birding Adventures, conducted by David ‘chook’ Crawford, a most knowledgeable person when it comes to birds and their habits. David helped us tick some wonderful iconic species, including … Golden-shouldered Parrot, Magnificent Riflebird, Eclectus Parrot, Palm Cockatoo, Trumpet Manucode, Fawn-breasted Bowerbird, Black-throated Finch, Star Finch, Red-backed Button Quail, Red-headed Honeyeater, Papuan and Marbled Frogmouth, Emerald Dove, Red-cheeked Parrot, Frilled Monarch, Brown-backed Honeyeater, and many, many others, 172 in total!


After completing the seven day trek I returned on my own and stayed in the area for another two weeks.


I spent a great deal of time traversing the drought affected Queensland outback, ticking numerous other arid country species. On this leg of my journey I covered regions around Normanton, Cloncurry, Julia Creek, Richmond, Hughendon, Winton, Boulia, Mount Isa, then down 516km of the Birdsville Track where the birding was incredible, (relatively speaking? – Ed), and the clear night skies were an astronomers dream.


The one downside of the whole trip was meeting a wonderful English backpacker at Cohen, and then learning that 4 hours later she was killed in a dune buggy accident. She was about to return to England to complete her medical degree. Everyone was upset. I also spent 6 days at Bowra, where the birding was a little quiet – just 64 species.


Jim



You can view more of Jim’s pictures in this Google Drive Folder.
Gouldiae

No comments:

Post a Comment