Sunday, August 14, 2011

Heyfield Birdwatchers - August 2011

G'day Birdos,
Heyfield Birdwatchers today had their ‘birds in gardens’ day for 2011. Thanks go to John and Marg, Mike and Dinny and Errol and Jenny for allowing the hordes to invade your beautiful native gardens.

The stunning view of Lake Glenmaggie from J&M’s property was complimented by sightings of pipits, several honeyeaters, Musk Lorikeets, Yellow and Yellow-rumped Thornbills, etc and a Jacky Winter busily getting the nest together for the breeding season. This was followed by coffee on the deck!

Jacky Winter

Richard's Pipit

The native plants in Mike and Dinny’s place are stunning. The saying that you never have to have a time of year without a native plant in flower is certainly borne out here. Grevilleas, callistemons, eremophilas, acacias, correas, … were all well attended to by the resident spinebills, new hollands, white-napes, etc. Blue Wrens dashed in out of the shrubbery and a family of Red-browed Finches darted out onto the lawns when they thought it was safe.

New Holland Honeyeater
The ‘house garden’ at Errol and Jenny’s place is a testament to the obvious hard work these keen gardeners put in. Lunch in the sunshine with the chorus of frogs from the nearby dam was just a delight. Crimson Rosellas and Rainbow Lorikeets dashed in every now and then and the various honeyeaters were busily drawing their dose of nectar from the flowering natives.

Jenny then took us for a short walk into her bush block to see pardalotes, whistlers, thrushes, thornbills … and a family of Flame Robins that wouldn’t quite get into camera range for me. I might just have to take up Errol and Jenny’s offer to return ‘at any time’.  

Male Flame Robin - in the distance!

Female flame
 A couple of us then briefly explored the bush part of the local golf course where we were accompanied for a while by next door’s pet macropod. Out on one of the fairways, the Wood Ducks showed signs of pairing up for the coming breeding season.

Polly!
Wood Ducks pairing
Top day, 40+ species, thanks to all concerned.
(In case you are new here, click on all images to enlarge)
Regards,
Gouldiae.


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