Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Black Cocky Damage

G'day,
Just down the road from home there is a small, neglected, seldom visited, (just my kind of habitat), flora reserve. On my walk through a day or so ago, I came across a small group of little Thornbills bathing in a tiny puddle. I'm not too certain of my 'buff rumps', but I think that's what they were.

Buff-rumped Thornbill?

Despite them not letting me get too close for a better shot, I spent a delightful 10 or 15 minutes watching them partake of their ablutions.

I continued on my walk and came across a group of damaged trees.




Closer inspection revealed that whatever had created the mess was probably after some form of wood boring larvae, most likely the Witchetty Grub.


It almost certainly had to be Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos. I'd seen quite large flocks of them previously in the reserve. Stunning birds that can do stunning damage.



The Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo occupies a range from southern Queensland, south and west to about Adelaide, taking in the coastal plains and adjacent ranges. Apparently there exists two races, and the birds from Queensland south to about here - Gippsland - will take seeds and grubs, etc, while the birds in western Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia have only a seed diet. Can anyone confirm this?

Regards,
Gouldiae.


2 comments:

  1. Hi Gouldiae
    My local Black Cockies (in NSW Southern Highlands) love to chew for grubs in Blackwood Wattle (A. melanoxylon) and also in shrubs of the Kangaroo Apple. Whole plants can be torn apart in the search for large fat grubs which bore the centre of the stem of these plants.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  2. Well that fits the profile Denis. The ones west of Melbourne intrigue me though.
    Gouldiae

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