Friday, August 28, 2009

Windy

The wind one morning sprang up from sleep,
Saying, “Now for a frolic! now for a leap!
Now for a madcap, galloping chase!
I’ll make a commotion in every place!”

(William Howitt, 18 December 1792 – 3 March 1879)

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G’day,

We have had westerly gales blowing for several days down here. On Wednesday the ladies had to mark their ball quickly once it was on the green, otherwise it was likely to blow off. When I watered some of the dry greens the other night, I had to position some of the sprinklers 5 or 6 metres upwind of the green.
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The couple of mm of rain has been enough to cause some of the Horse-dung Fungi, (Pisolithus sp), to ‘sprout’. This stuff always amazes me. It seems to prefer such tough conditions. I’ve seen it growing in the middle of a vehicle wheel track on a bush road. On the golf course it comes up in bare hard ground on the sides of fairways and in the rough where nothing else can survive. Cutting a young specimen open yields another surprise - the interior is made of gold and black 'cells' - quite unlike other fungi apparently.

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We were despairing for the greenhoods this year. The usual sites have yielded a little leaf but no flowers. Yesterday I stumbled across a small colony of Nodding Greenhoods, (Pterostylis nutans), and a few Maroonhoods, (Pterostylis pedunculata).

Regards,

Gouldiae.

10 comments:

  1. I especially like the wind poem and photo. We need rain also :-(

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  2. I'm glad you didn't get blown away! Obviously your golfers are very keen.

    That horse-dung fungis is a wonderful things. Have yet to see one.

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  3. G'day Mick,
    You can read the entire poem at http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/10585/,or one version of it at least. Yep, rain'd be good. BOM is still saying some for tomorrow and Sunday and the radar says there is some light stuff entering Melbourne now, (Friday night).
    Gouldiae.

    G'day Snail,
    I find the wind tiring. It's not much good for bird watching either. Good golfers are supposed to 'use' the wind but I certainly don't know how, and they say many of the world's best courses are in windy areas!
    Gouldiae.

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  4. But many of those 'best' links are WET and windy. Hope you get some more sitters.

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  5. G'day Tony,
    Did you mean sKitters? There's a little bit coming through right now. Might be able to have tomorrow off!
    Gouldiae

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  6. G'day Gouldiae!
    It's been very windy for days here too. And I keep worrying about the Raven family nesting in a tall tree near my window. Every morning I look at the tree with fear, but so far the nest construction proves to be very good and reliable. I don't have direct view and can't take any decent photos of the nest or the nestlings... Hope they survive these windy days and fledge soon.
    Best regards
    Nickolay

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  7. Fascinating fungi - I've heard of them but not met them personally, it really does look like horse dung!

    My commiserations re westerlies, my brother at Mossiface says the winds have been awful.
    cheers
    Barbara

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  8. Nice Greenhoods.
    I shall have to check out the local Maroonhoods. It is one of my favourites.
    Horrible winds - seemingly shared by many of us. Nasty, and tiring as you say.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  10. G'day Nickolay, Barbara and Denis,
    Winds have eased a bit thankfully. I helped out at another Bug Blitz with the local schools today and even the much lighter breeze was wearying, or was that the kids?
    Gouldiae.

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