Saturday, August 8, 2009

UFO!

G'day All,
Just before Glen and I headed off to Frankston this morning for a day with the grandchildren, (oh, and the daughters and sons-in-law), there was a small job to be done on the course. When I was picking up some sprinklers, my gaze began to focus on some nearby tree tops - something I tend to be a guilty of. As I did so, this odd shaped cloud was sitting just above the trees.


I haven't researched the type yet, so if anyone out there would like to enlighten me I would be very appreciative. It was the only cloud in the sky at the time.


While I'm on the topic of the firmament, the moon last night was full and very bright.

What a wonderful planet we occupy!
Regards,
Gouldiae.
PS: Thanks Bronwen, (see comments). It's a lenticular cloud. Seemed fairly low to me, so probably a 'strato cumulus standing lenticular formation'. There is an interesting article here, in Wikipedia. Great stuff!

7 comments:

  1. That's fantastic! I, for one, salute our new cloud-dwelling overlords.

    I think this formation is called a lenticular cloud. (But I ain't no meteorologist!)

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  2. I agree, a wonderful planet! And - I'm glad I discovered all the other nature bloggers who enjoy it as well!

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  3. Thanks Bronwen,
    You've come to my rescue again. Wikipedia describes the cloud exactly, see PS in blog.

    G'day Mick,
    Exactly. My sentiments too.

    Regards,
    Gouldiae.

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  4. Spectacular, and well-spotted Gouldiae. I've been wanting to see one of these myself.

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  5. Thanks Boobook,
    It was easy to spot all on its own. Would you believe, out birdwatching with friends today, one who is a glider fanatic said he'd spotted the cloud too and went up to use the various updrafts associated with it for some fun. He was there a bit later in the day worse luck - would have made a great shot.
    Gouldiae.

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  6. Lenticular clouds are very common in Gippsland due to the prevailing Westerlies over the Great Dividing Range.

    This one was in the lee of Mt Baw Baw over the Thompson Dam. I first spotted it around 8am Saturday on my way from Leongatha to Heyfield (via Sale) and it sat there all day.

    It was still there when I arrived home so I took off in my glider and rode the wave to 9,000 feet at 4-500 feet per minute. Quite low by wave standards; my local record is 22,000' over Mt Wellington.

    Lee waves can be quite rough down low but when you transition into the laminar flow, everything dead smooth and you get lifted upwards by a continuous surge.

    Fabulous fun!

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  7. G'day JG,
    Wow! Dunno if I would have enjoyed being in with you. Let me know next time you tackle one and I'll photograph your efforts - from the ground!
    Gouldiae.

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