Monday, July 6, 2009

Maniacal Cackler

G'day Readers,
We have several water bowls for the birds scattered throughout Mrs Gouldiae's garden. They are always under shady trees, like this one...

This particular bowl is dual purpose - holds water for the birds and provides habitat for a frog...

I think it is a Peron's Tree Frog, (Litoria peroni). In this next shot, you can just make out some of its distinguishing features - yellow and black mottling on the armpits and groin areas, cross shaped eye pupils, padded toes, small amount of webbing, plain coloured rough textured back...

These frogs are widespread in the Murray-Darling areas of Queensland and New South Wales. Their distribution map only just touches our part of the country. We're probably lucky to have them...

Their call is a long drawn out 'crah-ah-ah-ah-ah-ah-ahhk'. The alternative name of Maniacal Cackle Frog is quite descriptive.

This bloke provided me with a great opportunity to try out the macro settings on the new camera.
Regards,
Gouldiae.

13 comments:

  1. Great photos. You are making good use of the macro settings. I have been trying with mine with rather indifferent success. Still a steep learning curve!

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  2. That's fun Gouldiae, isn't it lovely when something simple like a little extra water can provide habitat for an interesting frog. We have the northern version of the Litoria peronii group, L.rothii. They look like your L.peronii and from your description it would seem that their calls are also similar!
    Regards
    Barbara

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  3. Those eyes make it hard to focus anywhere else. Good for those who XXX frogs.

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  4. Thanks Mick, Barbara and Tony.
    We have a dam nearby that has a frog population too. Haven't managed to get shots yet. They all set up a beautiful night chorus for much of the year, although we did have a visitor once who asked, "How do you sleep with all that croaking?"
    Funny isn't it? Glen and I are both a little noise conscious yet we find going to sleep with the frog chorus is wonderful!

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  5. Isn't nature wonderful? We can get so much pleasure from the little things close to home.
    You seem to have got a handle on the macro! Nice one.

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  6. G'day Boobook,
    You're so right. 'Fresh fields and pastures new' shouldn't always hold sway, eh?
    Gouldiae

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  7. Great photos hope the birds show up soon.

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  8. Hi Gouldiae, I can confirm your ID.
    That one is my most common frog here in Robertson. Where I live, I have high rainfall, but on a hilltop, so not many ponds. So Tree Frogs tend to dominate.
    They live in the Sassafras trees, and shrubbery, but hunt for Swift Moths on my windows, "in season".
    Yellow and black spots are a give-away.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  9. G'day Denis,
    Thank you for confirming the ID. I was fairly sure, but there was an element of doubt.
    Dunno if you re-check your comments for responses, but if you do, is the colour of your Perons similar to this one? I understand they can be variable, even locally.
    Gouldiae

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  10. So do I, and others, Neil.
    Gouldiae.

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  11. Hi Gouldiae
    Your frog is a bit more boldly marked than mine.
    Darkness of skin is variable, though, depending on circumstances (I mean I believe they can vary pigment levels somewhat).
    Try this link
    Hopefully that will take you to 3 different frog images.
    You will see one sitting on a door frame is brown, whereas normally they are grey. Another one found hiding under a sheet of plywood was almost black - hence my comment on changeable appearance - I think they can vary the pigment levels.
    Yours looks very fat and happy!
    Cheers
    Denis

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  12. Thanks Denis,
    Had a look at your entry. Very informative. They certainly can vary in appearance. I see yours had the green spots on the back, this one hasn't, (yet).
    Regards,
    Gouldiae

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  13. WOW, Gouldiae!
    The last image is a killer!
    Very impressive. And a beautiful little frog. I, too, love frog concerts a lot.
    Regards!

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