Monday, November 3, 2008

Seaton

G’day Blogworld,
Saturday was another warm and windy day, so to get away from watching the golf course drying out while the members were playing, I ducked up into the Seaton hills, Springs Rd, for a bit – no log trucks this time, it was the weekend.


I found an old log snigging track and descended it toward the floor of the valley, intending to get down where it was cool and perhaps even moist.

The regrowth from the ‘Coopers Creek’ fire in December 2006 was very evident along this track.
The birds were calling but mostly staying out of sight. At one point I got the two local species of Pardalotes calling together virtually from the treetops on opposite sides of the track – ‘widdyup, widdyup’ from the Striated on one side and ‘sweet dee-dee’ from the Spotted on the other. All the time there were wailing Currawong calls echoing across the gully and a Spotted Quail-thrush made a sudden dash across the track in front of me. This was more like it.

Here and there some colourful wildflowers were putting on a show, and in the case of this Prickly Parrot-pea species, attracting the local insects.

On the upper side of the track, in the disturbed ground that the bulldozer had created when the track was made, a profusion of overhanging plants had taken over.

A flash of the colourful wings of a butterfly caught my eye and I thought if Duncan was here, he’d keep tracking the insect until it settled long enough for a picture, I wonder should I try? I kept an eye on it and eventually it decided to sit still long enough for me to get a shot or two.


I think it’s a Caper White, a migrant from northern Australia. This species can sometimes migrate in large numbers and although the Caper plant is its preferred host, it will often make do with Banksias, Correas and Zieria species during migration.

I didn’t get to the bottom of the gully. Time was against me. I had to be back to quench those thirsty greens. I’ll just have to go back and do it all again.

Regards,
Gouldiae

9 comments:

  1. We seek the cool of the gully and those @#*# Pardalotes won't leave the tops!

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  2. Hi Gouldiae
    Junior Lepid had a Caper White yesterday.
    Interesting comment about alternative food plants (for them) - other than Capparis - for that group of plants does not grow along the NSW coast, but we get lots of the Caper Whites blown in on hot north-westerlies. We have lots of Banksias and Zierias - so that makes more sense.
    Cheers
    Denis

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  3. Your photos show a very interesting place for a walk. I especially liked the first photo of the old logging track.

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  4. G'day Tony,
    Yep, the Pardalote call can be very persistent. Delightful bird to look at though.
    Gouldiae.

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  5. Morning Denis,
    They're obviously on the move. Here's a link for a great data sheet on the species - http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~erg/java_ds.htm
    Regards,
    Gouldiae

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  6. G'day Mick,
    It was a nice little spot. I don't know what it is, but I could walk for hours along such tracks. Always seems to be something to see.
    Gouldiae

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  7. Well, there you go - Belenois java is not as fussy as we might have been led to believe when it comes to larval host plants.

    Gouldiae, that SA site is very good. I should have checked it again before I went to press the other day! :-)

    My S. Pardalote chicks are around 3weeks old. There's a form of whistling going on now between adults and chicks which I think must be some sort of family identification lesson in progress. It won't be long before they venture out of the nest! :-)

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  8. Nice post Gouldiae, can I book in for a guided tour? I can't pay much. ;-)

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  9. Good luck with the Pards JL - sweet little birds. Hope you have a successful fledging.
    Your on DF. I'll send you a quote, coffee scrolls inclusive.
    Gouldiae

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