Monday, November 17, 2008

A Minor Drama

G’day,
We’ve been ‘off the air’ for a short while. 35 degrees and hot northerly winds have been a bit of a bother, then next door’s calf got its head stuck in our fence, and Glen decided to try and extricate it. G had hold of the wires as the calf pulled back and suddenly released itself, and the fence returned to its original position like a slingshot. Result?


Fractured wrist, ouch! Must have hurt like h… I was away with Duncan doing a bird survey when it happened. (We’ll finish the last 3 sites soon DF). In the meantime, it’s been domestic duties a bit for me – gulp!

Anyway, just before all this, I was cruising G’s roses one day and was drawn to the amount of insect life on them.


Glen is pretty assiduous with keeping the aphids at bay, but there was a small contingent of hover flies in attendance.

This unknown specimen was checking out the roses too. I have no idea what it is....

We’re getting back to some sort of routine again now. Normal service should resume shortly.
Regards,
Gouldiae

PS: Thanks Denis, (see comments), you were not far off. It seems that last insect is the nymph form of the Gum Leaf Katydid. The link is to a page from 'Brisbane Insects and Spiders Daily', a fascinating site. Once you have the Katydid page open, click on home page and blog for an excellent record of invertebrates by Peter and Tony Chew.



11 comments:

  1. Lovely flowers, interesting insects - and OUCH! to the wrist. It looks bruised and swollen in the photo - take care!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd call it a major drama Gouldiae if it interferes with our birding activities!
    Just make sure you look after your good lady, cut up her food into nice little bite sized pieces, make the bed neatly, sweep the floors regularly, do the washing and ironing, feed the pets.......

    ReplyDelete
  3. G'day Mick,
    The roses are not their best this year, but not too bad. Swelling's gone down a bit since the pic, and it's now in a cast.
    Gouldiae

    ReplyDelete
  4. G'day DF,
    Er, thanks, I think. I'd best not let Glen see your list, she might add some to hers!
    Gouldiae

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ouch! That sounds painful.

    Some fascinating insect life on them roses. That last one is intriguing.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Mosura
    Commiserations to Glen. That sounds like a nasty accident. In a months time you may call it a "Comedy of Errors" - but don't use that line just yet!
    I have been browsing some insect sites for your last insect - without success. It has long antennae - which rules out an ant or a wasp. I was wondering about a juvenile Cricket (which have great antennae often), but wondered if the hind legs were developed enough for that. If they develop wings, they look very different.
    I favour it being related to the "Silent Leaf-runner" (Trigonidiinae) within the true Cricket family. At first I thought the rear legs were not big enough, but your photo is taken from behind, which angle reduces the usual impression of huge legs. I see it has large thighs. Can you check on the original image, to see if it has barbs on the lower end of the rear legs? Crickets usually do.
    Cheers
    Denis

    ReplyDelete
  7. You'll be busier than a one-armed paperhanger!

    On the other hand ... if a paperhanger can do the job one-handed?????? (Sorry G)

    ReplyDelete
  8. G'day Gouldiae,
    I wish Glen quick recovery with no complications at all!
    Beautiful photos of flowers and bugs!
    Wish I could get 10 of your 35 degrees. Then everyone would be happy. We are freezing again (as usual) in Hobart :(

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Tony and Nickolay,
    Recovery is well under way. We are having fun at present. Went shopping together today - haven't done that for a while. 6 weeks in plaster will take us just about right up to Christmas. We also have the the birth of our second grandchild very imminent.

    Denis,
    If you come back to these comments, check out the PS I've added to the original blog.

    Regards,
    Gouldiae

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Gouldiae
    Glad you worked through the Chew Website. I find it to be a goldmine of information.
    I knew the antennae were a clue. I went down the wrong side of the family tree (Crickets), as it turned out, but I knew from the long antennae it could not have been an ant or wasp - the obvious first choices.
    You persevered well to go past big fat green Katydids to find the pictures of the first instar.
    Congratulations. it is a great feeling to track through hundreds of photos till you get the right answer.
    You get the Sherlock Holmes award of the week.
    Cheers
    Denis

    ReplyDelete
  11. There's as many different colors in that wrist as there are in some of the flowers. I hope she's back to chasing you with the old rolling pin soon. :)

    ReplyDelete