Sunday, July 27, 2008

'Rock' Orchids in Owl Creek

G’day Good Readers,
I guess if I Googled up ‘Rock Orchid’ I would get a few pages of genuine Rock Orchids. Yep, just tried it, nearly 6 million pages.


I’ve always been fascinated by the way the Greenhoods in Owl Creek will grow very happily in the moss beds on the rocks. In some cases they must be surviving in barely 1 or 2 mm of soil.


I ventured up the gully yesterday and was a little dismayed to see the damage done by, I’m guessing, feral deer. DF and I had seen some evidence of this before, but the extent of it yesterday was alarming. Many plants had been extensively chewed, moss beds trampled, and in quite a few places the bank of the creek was collapsed.



The bird list was pretty good – Crescent and White-naped Honeyeaters, Yellow, Brown and Striated Thornbills, Red-browed Finches, Yellow Robins, King Parrots, Whipbird, Lyrebird, Blue Wrens, to name a few. There were also a few calls I couldn’t recognise and didn’t see the birds, but that might have been the mimicry of the Lyrebird at play. ‘Wild’ birds have to cooperate by, 1 sitting still, 2 in the sunlight, 3 no more than a metre or two away for me to get a half decent picture. A female Golden Whistler obliged for a short while yesterday. One day a male will cooperate in the same way – hopefully.


‘Owl’ Creek being one of the few moist localities around here at present, there was some fungi hiding under the rocks and logs too.


I quite enjoyed the outing, despite the very evident deer damage, and it was another opportunity to give J & N’s Calais a run while they are away on WET Magnetic Island.

Regards,
Gouldiae

5 comments:

  1. Betcha didn't take the Calais down to the bottom!

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  2. I have the same requirements for me to take pictures of birds. I think some of them might be catching on. Owl Creek? I like that name.

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  3. Hi Gouldiae nice fungi looks like marshallow

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  4. hi Gouldiae,

    In case you were wanting IDs for your orchids, the first is Pterostylis nutans (Nodding Greenhood), and the second is Taurantha concinna (Trim Greenhood) - well, my limited experience tells me this, anyhow.

    Your fungi is the remains of a species of Geastrum (Earthstar).

    Beaut photos !!

    Cheers
    Gaye

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  5. G'day Gaye,
    Yeah, I was up to speed on the Greenhoods. Remiss of me to not mention their names. If you visit here a bit, you'll probably see that I'm not an avid collector of ID's. I just love the variety and splendour of the things around me.
    Thanks for the fungi ID, that's one I wasn't certain of.
    Gouldiae

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